God Answers Prayer

For the Church

O GRACIOUS Father, we humbly beseech thee for thy holy Catholic Church; that thou wouldst be pleased to fill it with all truth, in all peace. Where it is corrupt, purify it; where it is in error, direct it; where in anything it is amiss, reform it. Where it is right, establish it; where it is in want, provide for it; where it is divided, reunite it; for the sake of him who died and rose again, and ever liveth to make intercession for us, Jesus Christ, thy Son, our Lord. Amen.

Bishop Grundorf at 2016 DEUS Synod

Bishop Grundorf at 2016 DEUS Synod

The Prayer for the Church originates from “A Summarie of Devotions,” written by Archbishop William Laud and first published in 1667. The prayer appeared in the American Prayer Book in the 1928 edition. It is among my favorite prayers, and I ask each of you to pray it as well.

When you pray, realize that Church is “Holy” because God calls it, sets it apart for His purposes, and fills it with the gifts of the Holy Spirit. In the prayer, the term “Catholic” applies to the Church as a whole, as the Body of Christ, and not in reference to a particular denominational portion of the Church.

I know that God hears our prayer and answers them, even regarding the Church. It is easy to find areas where the Church is in schism, and even heterodox, however, God appears to be pulling Orthodox Anglican Churches closer together.

Over the years, I’ve watched the APA and Reformed Episcopal Church (REC) cooperate. The REC administers the APA Clergy Pension Plan. REC Seminary in Philadelphia offers education tuition free to Anglican Postulants and Candidates.

In the last couple years, the APA and the Anglican Church in America (ACA) have moved closer to intercommunion. The APA now administers a Theological School, Logos House of Theological Studies, a school begun by the ACA but now serving the APA and ACA alike. Fr. William Martin, and APA priest, serves as the Academic Dean of Logos House.

If that were not enough, the ACC, APA, ACA, and the Diocese of the Holy Cross, all Orthodox Anglican jurisdictions, plan concurrent Synods in October 2017. St. Barnabus Anglican Church in Dunwoody, GA will host the APA Provincial Synod. God is moving to bring His Church together. God hears your prayers, and I encourage you to keep praying “For the Church.”

Archaeology Day Camp Cancelled

100_0365Science. History. Anthropology. Deductive reasoning. Archaeology demands a lot of its devotees, but the payoffs can be epic, ranging from life-changing discovery to a new appreciation for very old cultures. If your child roams your backyard with a metal detector and a shovel, combs riverbeds for arrowheads, or dreams of being the next Indiana Jones, then our archeology day-camp may be just the break that your child — and your lawn — needs.

DIG HISTORY! At the Abingdon Glebe Archaeology Day Camp in Gloucester may be just the ticket. Located at the Historic Abingdon Glebe house, the camp offers children from fourth and sixth grades the opportunity to help excavate the Abingdon Glebe historic site. The camp will run from Monday, June 26th through Wednesday, June 28th. The last day of the camp includes a field trip to an active archeological dig in Jamestown. The camp begins at 10AM and ends at 3PM. The cost is $45 payable to St. James Anglican Church. Lunch is not provided, so please pack your child’s lunch.

To register, click on the following link and download the forms.

Archeology-Camp-Registration-Form.2017

Print the form and mail it to the following address;

Archaeology Day Camp
C/O Fr. Kevin Sweeney
6124 Abingdon Glebe Ln.
Gloucester, VA 23061

or email it to kevin1sweeney@yahoo.com

 

Palm Sunday Processional & Holy Week Schedule

Dear Friends and Parishioners,
 
Sunday, weather permitting, we will process from the front porch of the Glebe in remembrance of our Lord’s triumphal entrance into Jerusalem. Please gather there prior to the service unless you have trouble walking.
 
Following is the St. James Schedule for Holy Week.
 
 
Wed., Mar. 23-10:00 AM-. 10:30 AM-Bible Study. Noon-Holy Communion. 6:00 PM Eve. Prayer.
 
Maundy Thursday-6:00 PM Holy Communion.
 
Good Friday Services;
 
9:00 AM– Morning Prayer 
Noon– Litany
3:00 PM– Evensong
6:00 PM-Holy Communion from the Reserved Sacrament
 
Sun., Mar. 27 – Easter Sunday-9:00 AM-Class on Prayer, 10:00 AM-Holy Communion. Birthday Potluck (Terry Schaeffer 3/17, Tracy Lanum 3/22.

Bishop’s Epistle

Anglican Province of America

Anglican Province of America

VOLUME XXI No. 6     November-December 2015

Greetings in the Name of our Lord and Savior, Jesus Christ.

There are certain reminders, as we are in the final quarter of the calendar year, such as the great feast day and season of All Saints and no more daylight savings time, that 2015 will soon go into the realm of history. As the leaves turn their fall colors and fall from the trees, we wonder where has the time gone? When we were children, we often thought how slowly time passes and we would think that some special event such as Christmas would never arrive. This month, I will be celebrating my 20th year as the Bishop of the Diocese of the East. Mary is planning an Open House from 3-6pm at our home on Saturday December 5, 2015 to share memories of the occasion. All are invited and welcome to come. One of the tasks was trying to remember who was at the Enthronement Eucharist and not forgetting someone. I have been looking back at the church directories of St. Alban’s Cathedral around 1995 and pictures taken at the Enthronement by Pat Peirce, and I was struck by the number who participated in the Service who have passed from this life: Archdeacon Gene Mitchusson, Canon William Weston, Bishop Norman Stewart, and Canon Rufus Kite-Powell are now gone from the Church Militant. All others who were there for the Service have changed physically — I had dark hair and dark beard! These events in our lives and the life of the Church are reminders that our earthly life is transient just as the seasons of the year pass so quickly.

With the passing events in life and in the life of the Church, we as Clergy and Laity of our Missions and Parishes do a review and reflect on the events of the past year at our Annual Meetings. Without a doubt at least most of us as Clergy, think about the good things that have happened in our Congregations and also tend to go through a certain amount of self-flagellation over the things we did or did not do. Acknowledge and move on as the saying goes. Each day the Lord gives us is an opportunity to bring glory to Him and to work for the spread of His Kingdom.

On Saturday, Nov. 14th, Bishop-elect William ‘Bill’ Perkins was Consecrated as a Bishop in the Church of God. Bishop Perkins will serve as a Suffragan Bishop in the Diocese of the East with concentration primarily to assist in the State of Florida and elsewhere as needed. As you will recall, Bishop Perkins was elected at the DEUS Synod in July 2015 in Charlottesville, Virginia. He will continue as the Rector of St. Mary the Virgin Anglican Church in Delray Beach, Florida. Please pray for Bishop Perkins, his wife Lou Anne, and family, that the Lord will bless his ministry as he takes on this new responsibility in the Church.

I was pleased to receive a message and an invitation recently from Fr. Wade Miller of St. Philip’s Anglican Church (formerly St. Francis) to come visit the Mission. You will recall that Fr. Miller was the recipient of our Lenten Appeal Funds to build or restart a dying Mission Church. Fr. Wade informed me since August 1st, when he officially began as Vicar, he has seen the little Mission go from 6 to up 35 congregants attending Sunday Eucharist. He has invited me to come on the weekend of December 19-20 for an Open House at the Miller home, Confirmations and reception of 20 new members. Thanks be to God!

In other news on the Ecumenical front, I attended, as your Bishop, the Anglican Catholic Church’s Provincial Synod held in Athens, Georgia this past week. Along with the APA were the Presiding Bishop of the Anglican Church in America (ACA), Bishop Brian Marsh, and his Suffragan Bishop, Bishop Jim Hiles. Our Bishop Chad Jones was invited but unable to attend due to the death of the former Rector of St. Barnabas’ Church, Dunwoody, Georgia, the Rev. Canon William Weston. Along with Bishop Paul Hewett of the Diocese of the Holy Cross, were invited guests from the Reformed Episcopal Church, the Most Rev. Royal Grote and Bishop Ray Sutton.

The culmination of four years of building friendships between communion partners of the APA and ACA and working with the Anglican Catholic Church (ACC), we reached an important milestone. Archbishop Mark Haverland announced that the ACC is now in de facto communion with the APA, ACA, and the Diocese of the Holy Cross (DHC). There is still work to be done to establish a formal communio in sacris agreement but this is the first critical and important stage of development in the “Continuing Church” both nationally and internationally. This is a witness to the Anglican world that the Continuing Church can come together in cooperation for the furtherance of God’s Kingdom.

Finally, as we enter the Advent Season and onward toward Christmas, we pray that all Christians everywhere will be inspired with the Message of Hope that our Lord Jesus Christ came to earth some 2000 years ago. Along with this great Hope, we anticipate the fulfillment of the promise of our Lord’s second advent. We live in a world that has lost sight of the Gospel message which is meant to bring joy and peace to men of good will. May the Advent Season be a time of solemn reflection on the year past and a purposeful resolve by God’s Grace to be faithful to our calling to serve Him in whatever or wherever he leads us in this coming year. Let us be thankful for all the blessings of this life: for family, friends and our Church. Let us pray for our enemies that the Lord will turn their hearts toward Him. Let us remember those who are suffering for their faith especially those Christians in the Middle East and our Communion Partners in India, the Philippines and Haiti.

May each of you have a blessed Advent Season,

+Walter

Rest in Peace: The Rev. Canon William R. Weston

By now most of you are aware that a long-time priest of the Diocese of the East and the APA and Rector of St. Barnabas’ Church, Dunwoody (Atlanta), Georgia, died on Saturday October 24, 2015 after a courageous battle with cancer. Our prayers are with Fr. Bill for his sweet repose and for the comfort of his wife Valerie. Fr. Bill was the driving force that has resulted in the beautiful Church building in Dunwoody. Bishop Chad Jones, Rector officiated at the Requiem Mass for Canon Weston on Saturday, October 31, 2015.

APA Winter Clergy Conference

Our Annual Winter Clergy Conference will be held this January 2016 in Oviedo (Orlando), FL at St. Alban’s Cathedral. Both Orlando (MCO) and Sanford (SFB) airports are options. The dates for the Winter Conference will start with social hour and dinner on Wed., Jan. 20th and conclude Fri., Jan. 22nd with a travelers’ Mass. Many thanks to Fr. Ralph Waterhouse and St. Alban’s Cathedral for agreeing to host this gathering of clergy, clergy wives, and deaconesses. The Bishop Advisory Committee and the Board of Examining Chaplains will be meeting on Tuesday in advance of the Conference and the Standing Committee will be meeting following the Conference on Friday morning.

Note: Please see pages 5 & 6 for proposed schedule and registration form.

Save the Date-DEUS Synod

The 2016 DEUS Synod will be hosted by Saint Matthew’s Church in Riverview (Tampa), Florida, the week of July 11-15. See page 4 for details.

Origins of Lent and Ash Wednesday

Ash WednesdayThe origins of Lent go back to the second century and can be traced to the fasts undertaken by candidates for Baptism at Easter. The ancient pre-Easter fast was only a couple days. St. Athanasius, Bishop of Alexandria, gives the first reference to the forty day fast in Pastoral Epistles he wrote on preparation for Easter. The Roman Church established the current six week period of Lent by the end of the fourth century. As the tradition of Easter Baptisms fell into disuse, the emphasis of the forty-day fast developed into a forty-day penitential season.

Biblical Precedent for Lent:
According to the Synoptic Gospels of Matthew, Mark and Luke; Jesus Christ spent 40 days fasting in the desert, where he endured temptation by Satan. Lent mirrors this 40 days of fasting as preparation for Easter. Sundays are days of feasting since every Sunday is a celebration of Christ’s Resurrection. They do not “count” in the calculation of the forty-day period, so the Lenten period of fasting began on a Wednesday. Accordingly, Christians fasted from Monday to Saturday (6 days) during 6 weeks and from Wednesday to Saturday (4 days) in the preceding week, thus making up the number of 40 days.

Ash Wednesday as the first day of Lent developed by the sixth century in an effort to keep Lent a forty-day period. It occurs 46 days (as before; 40 fasting days and 6 Sundays, which are not days of fast, are thus excluded) before Easter.

The name “Ash Wednesday” developed from rites practiced by the Church in France during the Middle Ages. Penitents seeking restoration to Holy Communion at Easter presented themselves at the Church the First Day of Lent. They were garbed on sackcloth and they cast the ashes of palms that had been blessed the preceding Palm Sunday upon their heads. The Church adopted this tradition and began the practice of marking the foreheads of all Christians on Ash Wednesday as a symbol of the penitential character of the Lenten season.

The Ashes:
The ashes used on Ash Wednesday are made from the blessed palms used in the Palm Sunday celebration of the previous year. The ashes are christened with Holy Water and are scented by exposure to incense. The ashes were so blessed at the 7:30AM service. While the ashes symbolize penance and contrition, they are also a reminder that God is gracious and merciful to those who call on Him with repentant hearts. His Divine mercy is of utmost importance during the season of Lent. During Lent, we are called to seek God’s mercy during the entire season with reflection, prayer and penance.

May you be blessed with a Holy Lenten Season.

BISHOP’S EPISTLE

Anglican Province of America

Anglican Province of America

VOLUME XX No.3                  July-September 2014

This is the year for Synods, one completed (DEUS) and three to go: Diocese of Mid-America, the Anglican Province of America Triennial and the Diocese of the West. All three remaining Synods will be in October of this year. Those who are in the East, it was a great privilege to gather in Orlando, Florida July 14-18, 2014 as St. Alban’s Cathedral hosted this Synod. For those who would like to see or relive the many events of Synod, they can be found in a slide presentation on the St. Alban’s Anglican Cathedral webpage (www.stalbansfl.com) compliments of official photographer of the Cathedral F. Harvell. Our great thanks goes out to the Dean of St. Alban’s Cathedral, the Very Rev. Ralph Waterhouse, to Synod Chairman, David Arnott, Co-Chairman, Felicia Ryerson, and all those who served on the various committees which made for a most efficient and successful time.

 

DEUS Synod 2014

 

For those unable to attend the DEUS Synod, I would like to give a re-cap of the major events including our guest presenters and speakers. In addition to the regular business of Synod, we had two developmental programs. The first program was presented by Michael Miller, Organist and Choir Director at St. Alban’s Cathedral, and also the Head of the Music Department at The Geneva School (Classical Christian School), Orlando, Florida. At my request, I asked him to do the sessions on simple intonation of the Psalms which I so enjoy at St. Alban’s Cathedral on my rare visits. Many of the Psalms set to music can be easily done by the most inexperienced musicians and congregations. It was great to hear the enthusiastic gathering of attendees quickly learning to sing the Psalm tunes that Michael had prepared. We were pleased to have Michael’s wife, Wendy, and Ryan Solomon assisting with the presentation. Michael has made himself available to assist anyone wishing to follow up on the sessions by simply emailing him at michael@stalbansfl.com. Those attending the presentations by Michael Miller were ready for more when we ran out of time!

Following the developmental program on music were morning and afternoon sessions with Bishop Stephen Scarlett, Ordinary of the Anglican Catholic Church, Diocese of the Holy Trinity and Rector of St. Matthew’s Church, Newport Beach, California. A number of our clergy know Bishop Scarlett by way of his webpage and parish teaching materials which are available on line. I will not try to recap all that Bishop Scarlett said in his presentations as there was much to consider in the area of building Mission. He has put the essence of his talks with us on his blog site at theevangelicalascetic.com or at bishopscarlett.com. I know that those who have a vision for the future of traditional Anglicanism must make common cause as there are those who are satisfied with being a museum to some imaged golden age of the past. Interestingly, he mentioned that we are more likely to build our churches by establishing and building relationships on an informal basis than by inviting people to come to church. People, especially millennials, have little or no reference to worship in church and can more likely be approached through cultivating friendship first. He emphasized that we must be willing to turn lose of those who want the church to remain just what they envision from the past and gather those around us who are willing to join us in genuine mission for Christ and his Church. We look forward to a strong and lasting relationship with Bishop Scarlett as we share so much in common in our vision for the future of traditional Anglicanism, in building Christ’s Kingdom on earth.

Update by Deacon Joel Pulga Arellano of the Philippines

We were pleased to have a Deacon Joel, who serves under the leadership of the Most Rev. Frederick Belmonte in the Philippines, with us for the DEUS Synod. He gave an update on activities in the Anglican Church of the Philippines with the purchase of the property near the City of Salano and the completion of the building project housing the Seminary along with a Chapel. The property purchase and the building were part of the Lenten Appeal Funds from 2013. Additionally, he showed pictures of the devastation from the hurricane which hit parts of the island about a year ago and the distribution of funds both from the APA and the ACA to help families with much needed food and agriculture supplies allowing them to re-plant vegetable gardens to help sustain the community. Also we were able to assist fishermen in the repair of their boats to return them to their livelihoods.

Provincial Synod October 15-17, 2014

I urge everyone to make plans to attend the Provincial Synod of our Church this October. This is a special event in the life of our Province, especially since we will be forging friendships and cooperative efforts with our inter-communion partners in the Anglican Church in America (ACA). Those who are members of the APA/Diocese of Mid-America are reminded that the DMA Diocesan Synod begins on that Wednesday from 8:00am until 1:30pm.

 

The House of Bishops meeting of the APA will be held on Wednesday, October 15, from 2pm until 5pm. Later that evening, following dinner, there will be a meeting of the Assembly of Bishops of both the ACA and the APA and other bishops from jurisdictions interested in this co-operative effort. We must pray and be a part of every legitimate effort to bring traditional Anglicans together in a unified voice for the advancement of the Gospel. Please check the APA webpage for the schedule of all the events.

We look forward to worshiping with our intercommunion partners as well as sharing fellowship with them at the Synod Banquet on Thursday evening. The National Shrine of Our Lady of the Snows in Belleville, Illinois, is a lovely venue for a Synod and provides an atmosphere of peace and quiet.

 

Final Word

 

To say we are living in a sin-sick world would be an understatement. Most of us are familiar with the news stories of war and savagery that are going on in the Middle East and watching our fellow Christians and others being slaughtered like animals. We are seeing pure evil manifested like most of us have not seen before. It is made all the more relevant through modern technology where it is difficult to be unaware.

I ask all of us to pray for the leaders of our civilized world to have wisdom and courage to confront the evil doers. We must pray for those who are suffering from the violence which is being perpetrated upon them and ask God to preserve the innocent.

Peace and blessings,

+Walter

SECOND Dig History! Archaeology Camp August 4, 5, and 6th

Archaeology Day Camp

history-1

The Glebe – 2011

Science. History. Anthropology. Deductive reasoning. Archaeology demands a lot of its devotees, but the payoffs can be epic, ranging from life-changing discovery to a new appreciation for very old cultures. If your child roams your backyard with a metal detector and a shovel, combs riverbeds for arrowheads, or dreams of being the next Indiana Jones, then our archeology day-camp may be just the break that your child — and your lawn — needs.

DIG HISTORY! At the Abingdon Glebe Archaeology Day Camp in Gloucester may be 100_0365just the ticket. Located at the Historic Abingdon Glebe house, the camp offers children from fourth and sixth grades the opportunity to help excavate the Abingdon Glebe historic site. The camp will run from Monday, August 4th through Wednesday, August 6th. The last day of the camp includes a field trip to an active archeological dig in Jamestown. The camp begins at 10AM and ends at 3PM. The cost is $35 payable to St. James Anglican Church. Lunch will not be provided, so please pack your child’s lunch.

The camp is a joint project of St. James Anglican Church and the Fairfield Foundation. To register, please contact Fr. Kevin Sweeney at (540)476-1471, or you may click on the following link to download the registration forms;

Archeology Camp Registration Form. Little Lights

The camp will be take place at St. James Anglican Church which is located off of route 17 in Gloucester behind Ken Houtz Chevrolet.

A brief history of the Abingdon Glebe

history-2

Ready for spring planting.

The Abingdon Glebe was built circa 1725 in Gloucester County. A Glebe is a tract of land that belongs to a church parish. Glebes were farmed to sustain the church and its staff. The Abingdon Glebe is located 4 miles in each direction from Ware Episcopal Church and Abingdon Episcopal Church. Originally, the priest who lived in the Abingdon Glebe served both parishes.

After the Revolution, legislation was passed that removed Virginia’s glebes from the Church of England. In 1802 the Abingdon Glebe was taken by Gloucester County and kept for use by the Peasley Free School. It was sold after 1870 with the proceeds going to the school system of Gloucester County.

In 2006, the Abingdon Glebe went full circle. Upon his death, Mr. William M. Riddick III bequeathed the historic Glebe and land to St. James Anglican Church. The 65 acre property is still a working farm, vicarage, chapel and the home of St. James Anglican Church.

 

 

Bishop’s Epistle January-March 2014

The Anglican Province of America

The Most Reverend Walter H. Grundorf, D.D., Presiding Bishop

3348 West State Rd. 426, Oviedo Florida 32765

Telephone: 407.657.0880 Fax: 407.657.4410 Email:apadeus@cfl.rr.com

Website: www.anglicanprovince.org

Volume XX No. 1                                                                                      January-March 2014

Anglican Province of America

Anglican Province of America

Greetings in the Name of the Father, Son and Holy Spirit!

Winter Clergy Conference

A number of us have just recently returned from what was a most unusual Winter Clergy Conference hosted by St. Barnabas’ Church in Atlanta (Dunwoody) Georgia. To begin with, Atlanta was hit by a severe winter storm which left the roads covered with ice and temperatures in the single digits leaving thousands of motorist stranded on the roads. A number of our clergy and others who planned to be there for the Conference were part of the number of stranded people. A few others cancelled or had to turn around and go home. It all seemed a disaster and the thoughts of cancelling the event came to mind a couple of times. In the end, after a couple of days of this, the sun came out and things got better. Our guests, Bishop Stephen Scarlett and his associate Lisa Marion from St. Matthew’s Church Newport Beach, California, arrived on a non-stop flight from Los Angeles to be welcomed to the frigid sunny south.

In the end, although the numbers were somewhat reduced, (approximately 50 of 70 made it) everything planned did occur. The Board of Examining Chaplains, the Bishop’s Advisory Committee, the Reconciliation Committee, the Clergy Conference, the Clergy Wives Conference and the Standing Committee all met. The highlight for all was the Conference Guest Speaker, the Rt. Rev. Stephen Scarlett, who did not disappoint. In his clear and winsome way, he gave not just “feel good platitudes” but tough talk about how we must approach the future and what it is going to take for traditional Anglicans to not just survive but to flourish as we move forward. In addition to the Sessions conducted by Bishop Scarlett, we were able to spend time with both Bishop Scarlett and his Associate Lisa Marion informally in the hospitality room getting to know them on a personal level and share our mutual hopes and dreams for the church. Also, we were blessed to have five bishops from the ACA: Bishop Marsh, Bishop Strawn, Bishop Langberg, Bishop Hiles and Bishop Owen Williams who were able to share this important time together as fellow Anglicans working to bring the church together. Joining us on Thursday of the Conference was Bishop Haverland, Archbishop of the Anglican Catholic Church. In spite of the weather threat, it was an important time together with all of the bishops and a number of our clergy together on a friendly basis. It certainly gives us hope for the future.

Because Bishop Scarlett was so well received (and likewise Lisa Marion) and what they had to say was of such value, I have asked them to return for our Diocesan Synod in July 2014. They have agreed to come. This will give those who were not able to attend the Winter Conference opportunity to hear what he has to present as well as the laity to hear him. As one of our Clergy said after the Sessions, “I want my laity to hear what he has to say as it is not just for the clergy.” Lisa Marion will also be speaking to the Clergy wives.

Election of Coadjutor for Diocese of Mid-America

Other important events happening this month in the APA include the election of a Bishop Coadjutor for the Diocese of Mid-America. This election will take place on February 22, 2014 at St. Andrew’s Church in Merrillville, Indiana. The results of this election will be announced by e-mail to the clergy and on our APA website. The Rt. Rev. Larry L. Shaver is the Bishop Ordinary.

Foreign Mission Activities

On February 11, 2014, our Vicar General for Global Partnerships Canon David Haines and Fr. Paul Rivard recently appointed member of our Missions Board will be journeying to the Philippines to visit Presiding Bishop Belmonte. They will be visiting the newly established Seminary facility in Salano, which was built through the help of our Lenten Fund in 2013. Since that time, a devastating storm hit the Philippines and they will visit the area most affected to assess how the funds raised by the APA and the ACA International Anglican Fellowship (IAF) can best be used to help in the recovery efforts. They will also help Bishop Belmonte, plan how best to minister in that country with their limited manpower and resources.

I want to personally thank Mr. Erv Lische, Chairman of the International Anglican Fellowship who has helped raise nearly $6,000 of the total $18,000. We wish to thank allwho contributed to the relief effort. Please pray for a safe and profitable journey for Fr. Haines and Fr. Rivard. They plan to return by February 21, 2014.

Institution of Rector for St. Matthew’s Church,Tampa, Florida.

Another important February event will be the Institution of a Rector at St. Matthew’s Anglican Church, Tampa (Riverview), FL. The Rev. Kenneth R. Bailey will be Instituted as the second Rector of St. Matthew’s at 11:00am February 22, 2014, succeeding long time Rector, the Very Rev. William Perkins.

We welcome Fr. Bailey and his family who came to us via the Episcopal Missionary Church, (EMC) where he served for over 14 years. It was a pleasant transition from Presiding Bishop Council Nedd and also endorsed by Fr. Bailey’s close friend, former EMC Presiding Bishop William Millsap. (Thank you to Fr. Brad Cunningham of Holy Trinity Fernandina Beach, Florida for his help).

Upcoming Ordinations

Looking forward there will be two special events in the DEUS in March. Two men were recommended for ordination to the diaconate by the Board of Examining Chaplains and approved by the Standing Committee during the Winter Conference. Scott Koszalinski and Josef Mayntz are both scheduled for ordination during the month of March 2014. Scott will be Ordered Deacon on Saturday March 22, at 11:00am at St. Mary the Virgin Anglican Church, Delray Beach, Florida and will serve on the Clerical staff at St. Mary’s. Josef is scheduled to be Ordered Deacon the following week on Saturday March 29 at 11:00am at St. Paul’s Anglican Parish, Melbourne, FL. He will serve on the Clerical Staff at St. Paul’s Church. God bless them both as they prepare for these special days.

Lenten Mission Appeal

Lent is fast approaching and as we think about this time of preparation, thoughts go to how best we can help those who are less fortunate. Each year we have an appeal for one of our Mission endeavors. The needs are so great and we seem so small and inadequate in face of this. Our Vicar General, Canon Haines, recently returned from a trip to South India with the intention to secure land for the Dalit Education Center (DEC) we have pledged to build. Most of you know we have been working with OM on this project, and we have every confidence in their work and ministry. The difficulty has been trying to find property close to where many of our Anglican Churches are located in order that our children may be able to attend the school. Canon Haines reports that out of the six pieces of property they looked at while he was there, one stood out as the most likely and we are pursuing this five acre tract through OM. Once this is secured, the building can then begin. It is also to be noted that in the last three years, due to the improved economy in India, prices have gone up. In fact they have nearly doubled. The good thing is we have enough funds to buy the property which is larger than we originally intended, and will give us greater ministry options and even the possibility of building a village church there as well. Canon Haines has many more details about this but what I am proposing is that we complete this effort and focus our Lenten Appeal towards continued building the DEC that we have begun.

Our Bishop Jaya Rao is very excited about the possibilities this school brings to this part of South India and is enthusiastically working with OM to make this a reality. Our plans are to bring Bishop Jaya Rao to our DEUS Synod in July 2014 along with his interpreter, so you can meet and hear his story. He is a wonderful man of God and has done an amazing job of building mission Churches in the Kadapa district of Andhra Pradesh. May we make this a most successful endeavor and pray that we will see the School established in this community along with all the other Christian ministries it brings.

There are so many exciting things going on in our Church and our partnership for which we give thanks. May the Lord bless us as we labor together to bring others who are in need of a Savior into His Kingdom.

Blessings to all,

+Walter

 

 

 

DIG HISTORY! At the Abingdon Glebe

Abingdon Glebe

Archaeology Day Camp

Science. History. Anthropology. Deductive reasoning. Archaeology demands a lot of its devotees, but the payoffs can be epic, ranging from life-changing discovery to a new appreciation for very old cultures. If your child roams your backyard with a metal detector and a shovel, combs riverbeds for arrowheads, or dreams of being the next Indiana Jones, then our archeology day-camp may be just the break that your child — and your lawn — needs.

DIG HISTORY! At the Abingdon Glebe Archaeology Day Camp in Gloucester may be just the ticket. Located at the Historic Abingdon Glebe house, the camp offers children from fourth and sixth grades the opportunity to help excavate the Abingdon Glebe historic site.  The camp will run from Monday, June 18th through Wednesday, June 20th.  The last day of the camp includes a field trip to an active archeological dig inJamestown.  The camp begins at 10AM and ends at 3PM.  The cost is $20 payable to St. James Anglican Church.  Lunch will not be provided, so please pack your child’s lunch.

The camp is a joint project of St. James Anglican Church and the Fairfield Foundation. To register, please contact Fr. Kevin Sweeney at (804)824-9552 or download a registration form from the Fairfield Foundation website at http://www.fairfieldfoundation.org/

The camp will be take place at St. James Anglican Church which is located off of route 17 in Gloucester behind Ken Houtz Chevrolet. 

A brief history of the Abingdon Glebe

The Abingdon Glebe was built circa 1725 inGloucester County. A Glebe is a tract of land that belongs to a church parish.  Glebes were farmed to sustain the church and its staff.  The Abingdon Glebe is located 4 miles in each direction from Ware Episcopal Church and Abingdon Episcopal Church. Originally, the priest who lived in the Abingdon Glebe served both parishes.

After the Revolution, legislation was passed that removed Virginia’s glebes from the Church of England. In 1802 the Abingdon Glebe was taken byGloucesterCounty and kept for use by thePeasleyFreeSchool. It was sold after 1870 with the proceeds going to the school system of Gloucester County.

In 2006, the Abingdon Glebe went full circle. Upon his death, Mr. William M. Riddick III bequeathed the historic Glebe and land to St. James Anglican Church. The 65 acre property is still a working farm, vicarage, chapel and the home of St. James Anglican Church.